Google+

La Cave 27, 75018

Leave a comment

October 30, 2013 by Emma Bentley

cave27

Inattendu. Insolite. Izakaya.

The first two words would be how the French would describe this izakaya. Quirky and completely unexpected.

The Japanese word izakaya originally comes from i meaning ‘to stay’ and sakaya a ‘saké shop’ and therefore loosely, it means a saké shop where you can hang out. That’s a pretty accurate description for the Cave 27.

With a floor space of no more than 12m², it is smaller than your average Parisian studio. It certainly feels like one too. There is just one table in the middle of the room. Stools pop out from nowhere to accommodate diners. Stepping over the threshold is like stepping into someone’s living room.

The host in this ‘apartment’ is Takemoto, an eccentric long grey-haired, flamenco-lover, who can greet you in English, French, Spanish, Arabic or Japanese.

Accordingly, there is an eccentric and international selection of alcohols on offer: French and Spanish wine (for between 11 and 15€ a bottle) and a few beers, as well as plenty of saké, shochu and Japanese whisky (I think I spotted a Nikka Miyagikyo Non-Age behind the bar.)

You can either perch at the bar or find a spot around the table. I still dont know how we managed to fit 8 people in there on Monday night. It looks like there’s only space for three. On Thursday, Friday and Saturday evenings, there is live music. Only le bon Dieu knows how they all fit.

As for food, you choose between small ‘tapas’ dishes or in an enormous saucepan in the middle of the table. The 2 dishes of tapas and a half-pitcher of saké for 6€ is a steal. If you fancy something a little more substantial, it’ll set you back 8€ per person for the steaming bowl of broth. Even with several rounds of food and drinks, you’ll get change back from a twenty euro note.

It really is the one of the most astounding places I’ve come across in Paris. Once you’ve got over the initial discomfort of being in this tiny room, the lowered boundaries mean that you end up making conversation with the other diners (something that never normally happens in Paris.) Food is shared, bottles ordered for the table, and new friends are made.

 


Essential Information

Address: 27 rue Lamarck, 75018
Contact Details: Email takemotomotoichi at yahoo.fr  
Opening Hours: from 12 noon – 14.30 and from 17h until midnight. Even on Mondays.
Reservations: not necessary.
Suggested footwear: don’t quote me on this but you could practically come here in your slippers!


Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Who’s Emma?


Hi! I live and work on a small winery in northern Italy but I also love to cook and eat. Welcome to the blog.

I’ve Moved

Because I no longer live in Paris, the blog has been given a complete rehaul. It's still a work in progress. Please excuse any broken links or typos.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,734 other followers

Instagram

Waves of #culatello! ...
#salumi #salami #charcuterie #italy "Careful! Watch out for the #dog. He drools and licks anyone!" 🐕 ...
#neighbourhood #myneighbourhood #friendlydog #dogsofinstagram #ineedoneofthose #italy

My Other Blog: Got Legs

“Vintage 2017 Report” Or “How To Protect Against Frost”

“Vintage 2017 Report” Or “How To Protect Against Frost”

It’s becoming an all-too-familiar scenario: a beautiful springtime with plenty of warm sunshine but followed by a sudden dip and freezing temperatures. A cold winter does marvels for the vineyard but once bud-burst has taken place, a cold snap can have catastrophic results. You may remember that I wrote about this already in 2016. Vintage 2016: […]

%d bloggers like this: